Welcome to The Balanced Writer, where we balance the things we love with the things that matter most.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Tipsy, Wobbly, Everyday Life... Plus a Giveaway!

Author Bonnie McCune

Win Bonnie McCune's book, 
Falling Like a Rock. 

1. Comment  on this post to win.
2. Include your contact information.
3. Expires 8/2/14. Good luck! 

Balance becomes a challenge as we age. I read articles warning me that one in three adults over 65 fall each year, and as I grew older, I sensed I was shakier on my feet. So naturally, balance moved to the top of my physical fitness list. I obsessed over it, a normal reaction for me. 

Top of the list was standing on one foot each time I brushed my teeth. This hasn’t helped. If anything, my wobbles and grabs for the vanity increased. Neither has Zumba dance class, which I began taking in the hope it would help. After several years, I’m still the only participant who can’t lift one foot off the floor and extend it while maintaining a position. And pausing at red lights to hover with a raised leg has only put me in danger of falling in front of a passing car.

This struggle makes me wonder about balance in life generally. It’s touted as a stress-reliever, a life enhancement, but we have a challenge implementing equilibrium between mind and body, work and family, spiritual and secular, self and others. Particularly given the approval awarded to successful people who work twelve hours a day, or students laboring under the immense 40-pound backpacks they all seem to carry, or the billionaire business leader squashing competitors right and left, or the model starving herself for her career. Bigger always seems to equate with better.

This is balance? ‘Fraid not. A complete rebooting’s required.

Although we pay lip service to the concept, achievement of it requires several steps. First, recognition that something is out of balance. Second, ability to see how we can change. Third, willingness to search, even fail in our journey. Fourth, strength to change.

Find examples of this progression in people around you and in books.  My new novel, Falling Like a Rock, features Elaine, a young woman struggling to find balance in her life, although she’s not aware of that. Believing she needs to be perfect, at the same time trying to please others, including hero Joe Richter-Leon, she battles an eating disorder, romantic misunderstandings, and personal conflict before a raging wildfire forces her to focus on what’s really valuable.

My inherent indolence and distractibility help me work toward balance. Because I’m lazy, I don’t get carried away with constant exercise. Because I’m easily bored, I’m not obsessed by reality television. And books, both the reading and the writing of them, provide constant change and challenge.

The recent death of a friend underscored for me the importance of balance and living each day fully. I was reminded how fleeting our existence and how valued our senses, experiences and thoughts should be. For me, the path to this appreciation comes first through awareness, being outwardly directed, then internal interpretation through writing. The challenge, as always, lies in balancing the two.

Stay balanced,
~Bonnie McCune


Unloved and unemployed. That’s Elaine Svoboda, after she’s sacked, then flees across country to her boyfriend who drops her flat. Teetering on the abyss of disaster, she calls an old friend who invites her to a tiny mountain town with fresh prospects. There she meets rugged, hunky Joe Richter-Leon, mayor of Falling Rock.

Funny and frank, poignant and perceptive, when two people are “Falling Like a Rock,” they learn surrender sometimes means victory.



About Bonnie
Bonnie McCune lives in Colorado and is the author of novels, novellas and short stories. A writer since the fifth grade, her interest in the craft led to her career in nonprofits doing public and community relations and marketing. Simultaneously, she published news and features as a free-lancer.

Her civic involvement includes grass-roots organizations, political campaigns, writers’ and arts’ groups, and children’s literacy. For years, she entered recipe contests and was a finalist once to the Pillsbury Cook Off. A special love is live theater. Had she been nine inches taller and thirty pounds lighter, she might have been an actress. For reasons unknown (an unacknowledged optimism?), she believes that one person can make a difference in this world. Her entire family is book-mad.

Bonnie’s writing explores the highs and lows of everyday people and their unique lives with humor, close attention, and appreciation.  Her blog addresses "ordinary people, extraordinary lives" and also features samples of shorter works. Visit  http://bonniemccune.com/ to connect with her.

Email:  Bonnie@BonnieMcCune.com